Who Watches The Men Without Shame?

The Snelgraphix Designing Minds Blog: “Don’t Try To Tease Them”

“Men Without Shame” is a great song.*

It brings me peace of mind. The song is full of personal meaning.

My maternal aunt bought me this record many decades ago.

She always told me that the lyrics reminded her of me.

She's passed on, but every time I hear this song, it's as if she's not gone.

I inherited my sense of humor from my aunt.

She would mock her children and nephews mercilessly.

“Now, as I understand it, the bards were feared. They were respected, but more than that they were feared. If you were just some magician, if you’d pissed off some witch, then what’s she gonna do, she’s gonna put a curse on you, and what’s gonna happen? Your hens are gonna lay funny, your milk’s gonna go sour, maybe one of your kids is gonna get a hare-lip or something like that — no big deal.

You piss off a bard, and forget about putting a curse on you, he might put a satire on you. And if he was a skillful bard, he puts a satire on you, it destroys you in the eyes of your community, it shows you up as ridiculous, lame, pathetic, worthless, in the eyes of your community, in the eyes of your family, in the eyes of your children, in the eyes of yourself, and if it’s a particularly good bard, and he’s written a particularly good satire, then three hundred years after you’re dead, people are still gonna be laughing, at what a twat you were.”

— ALAN MOORE*

Rhetorical claims of authority derived from magic used to define the order of the day back in medieval times.

Public relations developed from earlier bardic and religious traditions.

Advertising and marketing copywriters, as well as journalists, owe their professions to these prior, more skaldic practices.*****